Insights Into Remote Site Conditions Without Leaving Your Desk


Engineering · Construction · Law · Development · Everybody

Gain Insights Into Remote Site Conditions Without Leaving Your Desk: Industry trends, tips, and practical uses for aerial imagery and geographic data from First Base Solutions, the experts who brought you MapWarehouse.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Make Your Attraction Stand Out

How mapping technology enhances culture, tourism, & recreation services.


Unique and impressive landscapes, both natural and cultural are often the reason why popular tourism destinations developed in that place. The best assets of these sites are most clearly seen from above.

Marketing and Attractions

First Base Solutions can incorporate our aerial imagery into artwork and print it as a poster sized photo to show off a wide range of large-scale cultural and recreation facilities including stadiums, golf courses, and beaches, not to mention businesses, family farms, and cottages. Large, colourful customized aerial prints of your business make a fascinating conversation piece in your company’s lobby, waiting room, or trade show booth. First Base Solutions is also a provider of well known and easy to use Google for business solutions, popular for internal users to track assets and to make their presence known to the world, pinpointed on a public map.

Preserving Cultural Heritage

Landscape and ecological patterns and ground markings clearly visible from the air are not necessarily obvious from the ground. While aerial photos are a relatively new technology, they have been used around the world for a glimpse into the past to identify buried remains of long forgotten roads, fences, building foundations, cemetery sites and other evidence of human activity from irregularities in crop growth patterns and soil colour.

For Example...

Consider the Southwold Earthworks National Historic Site, south of London, Ontario, one of Canada’s first sites considered to be of national importance back in 1923. The remains of palisade walls from an early Attiwandaronk settlement form clear concentric circles when seen from above, but could be easily misinterpreted from the ground. Aerial interpretation offers a uniquely non-intrusive method to study such phenomenon, and preserve impressive cultural heritage for future generations to enjoy.

Southwold Earthworks National Historic Site, 2010 Orthophoto